The Teddington Gardener

The Mottisfont Pictorial Rose Catalogue continues with another update…

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Spong's'

Spong’s’

Spong

One of the most famous sports of Rosa x centifolia, originating in 1805, probably in England. It will reach 4ft (1.2m), bears typically rounded leaves of its parent and neat flowers about twice the size of De Meaux (also a sport of Rosa x centifolia), with the same good fragrance. Its failing is that the petals are apt to stay on the bush after fading. Prune after flowering. It is a charmer for a small garden

Veilchenblau

Veilchenblau

Veilchenblau

The north facing walls of the gardens have been given over to some very hardy ramblers (the south-facing walls playing host to the more tender Teas and Noisette climbers). The so-called ‘blue rambler’, Veilchenblau (violet-blue) never disappoints, being sweetly scented. Veilchenblau was raised in Germany in 1901, the result of a crossing between Crimson Rambler and Erinnerung an Brod, a Hybrid Perpetual rose. It is unique among several purplish rambler, since, after opening from crimson-purple buds, the flowers gradually fade to lilac-grey, each one having a small white stripe or two. If you have time, remove all the old flowering wood immediately the blooms have faded; if not as soon as you can, and tie up the young new shoots.

Leda

Leda

Leda

Here is a unique rose, which originated in England prior to 1832. It is of Damask derivation and has very dark green leaves which make a wonderful backcloth to the pale flowers. But who would think the glistening white flowers could emerge from those tight, dark, red-brown buds? Some flowers are almost entirely white, others carry the tint of the bud on the edge of the petals, earning it the name of Painted Damask. it makes a good, sturdy bush of some 4′ (1.2m) and required the usual thinning out of all once-flowering roses

Le Vesuve

Le Vesuve

Le Vesuve

One of the most satisfactory of the China roses is Le Vesuve, which will make a good bush to 4 or 5ft (1.2-1.5m) high and wide. It has rather angular growth – though bushy – and large red prickles. The foliage is neat, dark and coppery when young. It would be difficult to imagine flowers of greater charm in their loose shape, warm-coloured in the bud and opening to a soft flesh pink and delicately veined. Mutabilis and this rose require the same treatment and will climb high on a wall. Le Vesuve is hardier. It was raised in 1825.

Jacques Cartier

Jacques Cartier

Jacques Cartier

This rose, sometimes called Maquise Bocella, is one of the most reliable of the repeat-flowering Portland roses, hybrids of the Autumn Damask. The present rose was raised in 1868 and is of particularly sturdy upright growth, very prickly with small thorns, and with long-pointed, fresh green leaves. The extraordinarily tightly compacted, deep-centred buds are almost crimson, opening flat and densely filled with short petals, quartered and often with button eye, of a good bright pink. They are as full of scent as of petals. This and Comte de Chambord are two essentials for a garden of roses. To encourage new growths during the season, every one of which will bear flowers, prune fairly hard in winter.

Gloire des Mousseux

Gloire des Mousseux

Gloire des Mousseux

The sturdy form of an old Moss Rose, Gloire des Mousseux dates from 1852. The Moss rose is a superlative example of the quality and perfection that these old roses can attain. In Gloire des Mousseux, we have superior vigorous growth, light green leaves and mossy buds, opening into large, full blooms, expanding well and reflexing, of clear bright pink, fading to paler tones. They are long-lasting and rich in fragrance. The plant will  achieve 5ft (1.5m) in height and nearly as much in width and flowers profusely at midsummer.

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