Train Vintage Roses with Old-Fashioned Style…

The Telegraph 3:00PM GMT 17 Mar 2010 Train Vintage Roses with old-fashioned style By Bunny Guinness Vintage or old-fashioned roses are highly evocative. Their very names - Damask, Musk, Gallicas - are redolent of the age of cucumber sandwiches on the lawn, trysts in bowers and tennis parties. All the things we no longer have…

A family affair

With a thought to my rose talk tomorrow, I’m refreshing my memory about this remarkable woman, Mme Isaac Pereire

The Teddington Gardener

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Madame Isaac Pereire (top left), with Lady Emma Hamilton (top right) and Evelyn.

I’ve touched upon this before – the history of women who gave their name to some of the finest classic old roses – for example Madam Isaac Pereire, Madam d’Arblay, Madame Pierre Oger, Madame Alfred Carriere. There are hundreds of roses with the prefix ‘Madame’ but the details of many of their lives are often unknown –  or if documented, their histories deserve to be better remembered.

In many cases, especially with roses bred in the 19th century, they include the wives of eminent men – statesmen, soldiers or businessmen – while some were eminent in their own right. In many cases they were members of the rose breeder’s own family.

There is an article by Peter Scott in The Royal National Rose Society Historic Rose Journal No. 32 Autumn 2006 which gives a biography of some of these…

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Old Rose, Tea, Fruit, Musk, Myrrh – fragrance & unlocking the secrets of the rose

This article is by Robert Calkin, originally published in The Royal National Rose Society Historic Rose Journal Autumn 2013. If you are not a member of the Historic Rose Group, articles such as these are just one reason to join! All the photography is mine. The weather this afternoon is so foul, I've enjoyed the…

Suitable for a northerly aspect? Roses only tolerate such a situation, they don’t necessarily enjoy it! (Peter Beales)

Roses for Partial Shade? David Austin - "The English Roses enjoy areas of partial shade, providing that there is at least four to five hours of sunshine every day. They make a great way to brighten up a shady area. The main thing is to take care to avoid areas where there are overhanging branches…

Ma Perkins, Mme Caroline Testout, Constance Spry, D T Poulson, Belle Isis, Dainty Maid, Mary Rose, Baroness Rothschild, Chaucer, Mme de Tartas, Lady Mary Fitzwilliam and Duchesse de Montebello – all related to David Austin’s brother-in-law…

 Ma Perkins, Mme Caroline Testout, Constance Spry, Belle Isis, Dainty Maid, DT Poulson, Mme de Tartas, Lady Fitzwilliam, Mary Rose, Baroness Rothschild, Chaucer and Duchesse de Montebello - all parents, grandparents, aunts or uncles, great aunts or great uncles - or cousins - of LD Braithwaite - who is David Austin's brother in law! Confused, you will be:…

Roses – from the Arctic to India

From the Arctic to India Michael Marriott, writing in the Financial Times in May 2011 (link below) Roses are exceptional plants. They vary in size from tiny species of a few centimetres to huge ramblers growing tens of metres into trees. Their flowers can be just a few millimetres across, or 20cm or more, and…