The Teddington Gardener

A new ‘old’ way with Wisteria and a very old Wisteria indeed – more from Kew Gardens

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Wisteria floribunda Alba – near to the Duke’s Garden within the larger Kew Gardens.

We all know that Wisteria can clothe the front of a house with exceptional grace and beauty – and great vigour – elsewhere filling pergolas and arbours with colour and scent (and that reminds me that I am probably too late to see the 100′ walkway at Nymans, which filters sunlight through tortuous old stems and bright blue trails of peppery-scented flowers). We see them as standards  – and marvel at how they can remain so compact and still be floriferous and graceful.

I’ve not seen them grown on short posts like this, giving a modest few feet of height and a great spread – ground cover wisteria? A matched planting of the more usual blue wisteria is to be found a hundred metres or so distant, but I neglected to photograph that specimen at all

Beautiful as it undoubtedly is, good horticultural practices are clearly an issue given the froth of weeds roiling beneath the pendant white racemes.

http://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/details?plantid=2043

In another location at Kew is a Wisteria specimen remarkable for its age – planted in 1761 if I am reading the notice correctly?

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http://www.kew.org/ucm/groups/public/documents/document/kppcont_030310.pdf

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