The Teddington Gardener

A roundup of recent tweetery – snowdrops & camellias, hellebores of course

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Galanthus Warburg Primrose (above) and Galanthus Bertram Anderson (below)

Galanthus Betram Anderson 1

Galanthus Betram Anderson

Galanthus elwesii var. elwesii 'Maidwell L

Galanthus elwesii var elwesii Maidwell L (above) and Galanthus nivalis Magnet (below)

galanthus nivalis magnet

Galanthus plicatus Colossus

Galanthus plicatus Colossus (above and below)

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‘Tis Snowdrop time, as with much else, early this year and so I thought I’d get myself into gear with a just a select selection. More, obviously, to come.

And a roundup of recently tweeted images, just to make sure I haven’t kept anything back from the folks at The Teddington Gardener (plus I think, especially with the Hellebores, more is more, even if they are repeats…)

This gallery are all Ashwood hybrids – such a range of freckles and dots, blotches and picotee edges, solid pure colours and blends, singles, anemone-centred and doubles with contrasting or complimentary nectaries to set the whole thing off –

… and they make superb floral displays, either as longer stems in simple posies (in which case blanch the cut stems in just boiled water for 10 seconds) or as floating heads in your favourite bowl

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hellebore20

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Distinct from the Ashwood hybrids, this rare beautiy (below) Hellebore x belcheri Pink Ice, an interspecies cross between Helleborus niger and Helleborus thibetanus. It’s causing quite a stir and was bred at Ashwood Nurseries in the West Midlands

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The start of the journey for any new hellebore at Ashwood Nurseries begins in this glasshouse. Would have loved to spend an hour in here with this low sun streaking through.

The Camellia season is getting underway too – again a little early for some of the cultivars/species and these caught my eye on my recent travels –

This wall-trained cotoneaster – also caught my eye, though I don’t think it is the usual C. horizontalis, in the absence of the herringbone branching that is typical.

cotoneaster

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Finally, the gloss on this Sarcococca confusa – and the clean white threads of the scented flowers had to be admired and photographed. I’ve four of these to plant in the next week or so and will look forward to enjoying their scent in the garden in the years to come.

 

 

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