The Teddington Gardener

and the final few from an April afternoon at RHS Wisley…

DSCF1370

DSCF1031

Violas and wallflowers in a very successful partnership. The viola is Etain, a particularly hardworking plant that will be in flower from spring through to autumn, needing little care other than regular watering and clipping back if it gets too leggy. I shall be copying this next year.

DSCF1040

Meanwhile, some flamingo pink in the gardens – Toona sinensis- one specimen to be found each at the top and bottom of Battleston Hill and visible from a good distance. Not pink blossom, just the remarkable leaves.

  • A deciduous, often multi-stemmed tree, which makes a fine specimen in a sunny garden. In spring, the big, pinnate leaves emerge a bright salmon pink and gradually change colour to creamy yellow and later rich green in summer. The clusters of greenish white, cup-shaped flowers that appear in summer seem to dangle from the ends of the branches and are loved by insects. All parts of the plant are scented and the wood is often burnt in temples in Eastern Asia to infuse them with its delicate scent. The timber is also valuable for making furniture as it is very durable and easy to work with.
  • Garden care: In late spring or early summer after flowering lightly cut back any branches that spoil the symmetry of the plant and apply a generous 5-7cm (2-3in) mulch of well-rotted garden compost or manure around the base of the plant. In autumn trim back lightly any branches that obscure the display of fruit.

 

DSCF1046

DSCF1043

DSCF1298

DSCF1073

DSCF1074

Lamprocapnos spectabile – formerly Dicentra spectabile

DSCF1089

Magnolia x brooklynensis Woodsman (above and below) with flowers a mix of yellow, green and purple

DSCF1088

DSCF1107

Convallaria majalis (quite happy here) and the Judas Tree, Cercis Siliquastrum, blooming on bare stems, above yellow Primulas

DSCF1163

DSCF1179

DSCF1231

Asarum europaeum – beautiful, kidney-shaped glossy marbled leaves. Excellent groundcover.

DSCF1281

DSCF1325

Aquilegia and Rhododendrons (above) and a flowering dogwood, Cornus x rutgersiensis ‘Ruth Ellen’ (below)

http://www.junker.co.uk/cornus29.htm

DSCF1339

DSCF1342

DSCF1371

DSCF1373

I really like this combination of French Lavender and Stipa tenuissima, a very successful partnership, adding bulk and volume to each display. This too I shall be copying!

DSCF1378

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: